1. On Networking

    A friend of mine recently asked for networking tips. I suppose I wear my enthusiasm for it on my sleeve. 

    In case any others may find it helpful, I’m reposting my email response to her here: 

    1. Be confident. People do want to help you, I promise. Odds are, they got their current job from the same process. They’re just paying it forward. Start networking with close friends and mentors. They want to see you succeed so it’s a great place to jumpstart. 
    2. Be flexible. I like to see networking as a branch on a tree. I know it’s super cheesy, but the visual helps me. The conversations you have will lead you in varying directions, and you have to stay open minded to that. Some conversations I’ve had, I realized I’m not going to get anywhere within 2 minutes of being on the phone… others lead me down an incredibly productive path. Keep yourself open to following the branch on the tree that feels most comfortable. 
    3. Be authentic. I’m super up front when I talk to people about my current situation, what I’m looking for, what I think my weaknesses are, etc.
    4.Be grateful and humble. People like to know that their time is well spent and that they’ve helped you in some way. Even if you listened to crickets half of the conversation, it was still helpful for you. Be overly appreciative of people’s time and advice, regardless of the outcome of the conversation. 
    4.Be savvy. Use LinkedIn and twitter like they’re your best friend. Look up organizations that you think are interesting and immediately go on both of their sites — see if you have connections and follow people. One of the best networking conversations I’ve had to date was a person who guest blogged on a professional blog I follow. After commenting on the post, I went straight to twitter, asked her for a chat, and she said yes! (this woman is super popular with like tens of thousands of followers). I only asked for 15 min of her time… and it was the best 15 minutes I’ve had to date. She said “most people are too scared to ask, I’m always willing to help people in your shoes”.
    What are your networking tips? 

  2. Finding Flexibility

    So, I had a baby. Did I tell you that already, invisible blog readers? Here he is: 

    I KNOW. That drool monster is my child. I can hardly stand it. 

    He’s now just over 5 months old and well, I’m ready to go back to work. Ready to find a bit more balance in my life and contribute in new ways. It’s tremendously exciting - the networking with adults who have real conversations with me, talking to people who have my dream job (in case you’re wondering - it’s in New York, and it’s taunting me), reading job descriptions and feeling confident that my education prepared me well for the roles. 

    Here’s the catch - I don’t want to leave home. I absolutely love working from home. 9-5’er in the cubicle, I am not. I feel most productive and creative with a pot of coffee in the kitchen, a quiet room free of chatter, and sweatpants on. If I need a change of scenery? There are plenty of great coffee shops around here that would love my business. (Side note: I’m not alone - new research shows greater productivity, longer hours, and improved job satisfaction from folks who work at home)

    Don’t get me wrong, there’s a time and place for in-person collaboration and connecting but I have grown accustomed to using online tools for this quite well. Google+ easily allows me to have in-person meetings with anyone in the world. I can instantly chat with folks as I run through my inbox. I connect with hundreds of brilliant minds on twitter everyday, sharing content and ideas. 

    Not requiring an office environment 9-5 each day gels nicely with the fact that I have this 5 month old, too. Ideally, we’re able to find childcare to keep him at home for a little while longer, allowing me to be close to him and feed him, foregoing the need to be attached to a pump throughout the day. And for the days I need to be gone? No problem… In fact, I’d love to travel some and break up the day-to-day routine. 

    This all sounds reasonable, right? Well after my month or so of job searching, I’m starting to believe it’s utopia. 

    "We’re not big enough for virtual employees"     "It’s not really good for our culture"     "It takes a lot of trust to have people working from home"     "We like people in the office… it’s the way things have always been done around here" 

    Y’all. I can’t find it. I can’t find a job that allows me to do what I love, in an environment that makes me an even better employee, and be close by for my baby when he needs it. If you know of any leads, by all means tell me. (Here’s more about my background and what I’m looking for) 

    As a disclaimer, I’m fully aware that I’m beyond fortunate to be where I am and please don’t take this as complaining. Unlike many, I have an overly supportive partner, an advanced degree, my family is in good health… I could go on forever. 

    The point of this writing is to ask the question, Why is our country’s workforce still so behind on allowing moms the flexibility they need or want? 


  3. Email, for example, is addictive because it provides all three reward types at random intervals. First, we have a social obligation to answer our emails (the tribe). We are also conditioned to know that an email may tell us information about a potential business opportunity (the hunt). And finally, our email seems to call for us to complete the task of removing the unopened item notification in a sort of challenge to gain control over it (the self). Interestingly, these motivations go away as soon as we’ve actually opened all our emails and the mystery disappears. We’re addicted to checking email while there is still variability of reward and once that’s gone, emails languish in our inboxes.

    — Want To Hook Users? Drive Them Crazy. | Nir and Far (via likesandlaunch)

  4. emphasisadded:

food for thought 
[via: leekfixer: haygirlhay: joannafreed]

    emphasisadded:

    food for thought

    [via: leekfixer: haygirlhayjoannafreed]

  5. so, so great. i love this. 
thecomposites:

Daisy Buchanan, The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth…a conscientious expression…Slenderly, languidly…an expression of unthoughtful sadness…her cheeks flushed…she looked at me with an absolute smirk on her lovely face as if she had asserted her membership in a rather distinguished secret society…a bright ecstatic smile…Aching, grieving beauty… For Daisy was young and her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery…Girls were swooning backward playfully into men’s arms, even into groups knowing that some one would arrest their falls—but no one swooned backward on Gatsby and no French bob touched Gatsby’s shoulder. (Multiple suggestions)
Updated image: Reader Tessa Cramphorn points out that “autumn-leaf yellow of her hair” is in reference to Jordan Baker. Further, Tessa provides this line describing Daisy’s hair as “dark shining.”  Composites fact checker Emily Schultz believes there is a contradiction in Fitzgerald’s text regarding Daisy Buchanan’s hair, noting the passage where Daisy compares her own hair to her daughter’s “yellowy hair.”  

    so, so great. i love this. 

    thecomposites:

    Daisy Buchanan, The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth…a conscientious expression…Slenderly, languidly…an expression of unthoughtful sadness…her cheeks flushed…she looked at me with an absolute smirk on her lovely face as if she had asserted her membership in a rather distinguished secret society…a bright ecstatic smile…Aching, grieving beauty… For Daisy was young and her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery…Girls were swooning backward playfully into men’s arms, even into groups knowing that some one would arrest their falls—but no one swooned backward on Gatsby and no French bob touched Gatsby’s shoulder. (Multiple suggestions)

    Updated image: Reader Tessa Cramphorn points out that “autumn-leaf yellow of her hair” is in reference to Jordan Baker. Further, Tessa provides this line describing Daisy’s hair as “dark shining.”  Composites fact checker Emily Schultz believes there is a contradiction in Fitzgerald’s text regarding Daisy Buchanan’s hair, noting the passage where Daisy compares her own hair to her daughter’s “yellowy hair.”  

  6. The Vote Against Project: Unity Wall Spotlight: Kaitlin Mercurio & Jason Franasiak →

    voteagainst:

    1. Tell us a little bit about yourself/yourselves.

    We are Jason Franasiak and Kaitlin Mercurio. We are recently married (May will mark our one year anniversary) and are enjoying every minute! We moved to NC about two and a half years ago for Jason to attend UNC as an OB/GYN resident. I…

  7. stephen colbert and maurice sendak

    these two are an absolute riot together. 

    part 1

    part 2 

    via Marvelous Kiddo

  8. North Carolina’s “Vote Against” Project

    advocatephotos:

    Advocate Art Dept: Vote Against
    On May 8, North Carolina voters will choose whether or not to ban same-sex marriage in their home state. Raleigh-based photographer Curtis Brown, determined to “defeat discrimination” with the help of a team of dedicated volunteers has begun The Vote Against Project. Similar to Adam Bouska’s NOH8 campaign in California, this photo project captures portraits of people of all shapes, sizes, and backgrounds with one common theme: they oppose the anti-gay marriage amendment. See examples of these portraits, along with a video about the project, after the jump.

    To learn more about The Vote Against Project, visit it’s website.

    Read More

  9. emphasisadded:

you can, you know. [via:quyenhuynh:oliviarz]

    emphasisadded:

    you can, you know. [via:quyenhuynh:oliviarz]

  10. guilty, as charged. 
by: someecards
via: Cup of JO

    guilty, as charged. 

    by: someecards

    via: Cup of JO